Author Archives: hlj

New Meeting Location in Redwood City

In the December 2012 meeting, our members voted to change our meeting site because of expenses associated with the golf course restaurant in San Mateo. The new meeting location, effective in January 2013 is Harry’s Hofbrau restaurant in Redwood City. Click on the MEETING INFO menu tab for the new meeting times and directions.

Meeting of April 16, 2013

Dana Lombardy on “The Long Arm of Mr. Lincoln’s Army”

black-and-white headshot

Dana Lombardy

Dana presented diagrams and data to show how the artillery evolved in the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War, and compares its effectiveness to the guns used by their primary opponent, Robert E. Lee’s Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. Gun types, numbers and organization, plus a look back at Napoleon’s artillery at Waterloo were also covered. Continue reading

Meeting of March 19, 2013

John Herberich on “The 4th U.S. Cavalry in the Civil War”

Cavalry Orderly, Rappahannock Station, Va., by Edwin Forbes (Wikipedia)

John provided a detailed look at the regiment of his great-grandfather, the 4th U.S. cavalry, covering its history in the Western theater and a look at some of its tactics, primarily the saber.

Meeting of February 19, 2013

Howard Jones on “A.S. Johnston”

The life and career of Confederate General Johnston, the Western theater commander who was killed at the Battle of Shiloh.

Albert Sidney Johnston (Wikipedia)

Howard Jones

Howard Jones

The following meeting summary was provided by Charlie Sweeny. General Johnston was considered the Number Two general at the time of his death in 1862. (Note by Hal Jespersen: Johnston was in fact the second ranking full general in the Confederacy, following the adjutant general, Samuel Cooper. Robert E. Lee was number three, Joseph E. Johnston four, P.G.T. Beauregard five, and Braxton Bragg six. Until his death at Shiloh, Albert Sidney Johnston was considered by Jefferson Davis to be the best general in the Confederate States Army.)

Meeting of January 15, 2013

Ray Cosyn on “Flying Tigers”

R.T. Smith photo, 1942. Hell's Angels, The Flying Tigers - China

R.T. Smith photo, 1942. Hell’s Angels, The Flying Tigers – China

In the early days of what was to become WWII in the Pacific, a small group of Americans began training for what was going to become one of the most heroic efforts of the war. The Chinese had been invaded and needed an air force to protect their supply lines and allow them to survive the unceasing onslaught of the Empire of Japan. This presentation covered the formation of the American Volunteer Group, the perils of Flying the Hump, and the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo. This was the American Air War in China that lasted for the time it took to defeat the Japanese. The foundations of the Sino-Japanese War was presented along with the strategy that was put in place to allow the Chinese Nationalist Government to survive the war. Continue reading

Meeting of December 18, 2012

Bob Hubbs on “Holly Springs—Grant’s Worst Nightmare?”

Bob’s presentation detailed the Holly Springs Raid, which occurred in the Vicksburg Campaign, December 1862, and review Grant’s greatest challenge. Grant’s strategy, offensive and defensive, for the capture of Vicksburg and the final phase of the Anaconda Plan were introduced. The first campaign for the capture of Vicksburg and the ramifications of that effort were presented. Grant’s reaction to his Army’s incompetent response to the attack by Van Dorn and his cavalry and the capture of Union troops and the destruction of supplies and equipment at Holly Springs, Mississippi. Why the Holly Springs raid and connected events were worse than any of the other events in Grant’s up and down, always changing life.

Meeting of November 20, 2012

Dr. Bob Asnard on “CSS Shenandoah”

Bob recounted the story of the C.S.S. Shenandoah from when she was the Sea King, being built in English docks, fitted-out in the Azores, her various escapades, as well as her final battle with the New England Whaling Fleet of the Arctic.

Meeting of September 18, 2012

Charlie Sweeny on “Thugee: The Murder Cult”

Our loyal secretary presented a program of how the British Raj eliminated this hereditary tribe. An entire Hindu religious group of murdering thieves was given a 19th-century Final Solution. Charlie notes that the wonderful 1938 movie Gunga Din, was a fictional account of Thugee.